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Too much exclusive licensing

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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19
Maybe the answer is some kind of cross platform subscription that gives you access to everything as I can't see exclusive deals going away?
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19

Karrissel wrote:

Maybe the answer is some kind of cross platform subscription that gives you access to everything as I can't see exclusive deals going away?


How would that help in most of the world where many of those platforms with the exclusive rights aren't available? I mean sure it might solve the problem in the US and possibly the UK, Ireland and Canada, but how many other places besides that?
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19
I think regional availability is a different problem - often down to projections of demand v the cost of translation not to mention legal costs for complicated licensing.
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19

JorduSpeaks wrote:

Bidding for exclusive licenses is anti-competitive practice, pure and simple. It only makes for a worse experience for the consumer, and it encourages piracy from those who actually want to pay money to support the industry.

The production studios know this. When production studios grant exclusive licenses, they signal that exclusive streaming money is worth you pirating their product.


Your post demonstrates that you don't understand how business in general works and anime distribution in particular. First, it's not that production studios "grant exclusive licenses", it's that that is the only way that a distributor/streamer would pay them at all. Crunchy isn't going to pay a license-holder any money UNLESS they get exclusive rights to exploit the title. Hey, the production companies would be happier than hell to collect money from ALL distributors for the same content but that's fantasy land.

Crunchy, for example, is prepared to pay X for Title A as long it is the only one allowed to stream it in specific territories. Without that exclusive right, what's the point of paying money for something that's going to run on all your competitors platforms as well as yours? It's all about trying to get maximum eyeballs for your exclusive content. The entire industry would fall apart without this.



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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19

Karrissel wrote:

I think regional availability is a different problem - often down to projections of demand v the cost of translation not to mention legal costs for complicated licensing.


Perhaps in some regions, but for example despite living in a non-English speaking part of Europe anime isn't translated to anything but English where I live. Except on TV. But not on CR. So theoretically there is no reason for why I shouldn't have the same access as any other CR viewer. They do translate into German I know, but then there are quite a few countries that speak German. The same might also be true of both French and Spanish, especially considering that there are many countries where either language is spoken.
The other issue is licensing, which I admit I can't say I have any particular knowledge about, except my impression is that much of how it works is fairly outdated as it is built up on the book publishing industry and such, and is somewhat unwieldy in an internet age, with global streaming services, and the possibility of being able to buy and download online.

But If CR is the one limiting content here, due to "projections of demand" (since language isn't an issue) I am nonplussed as to many of their choices, as it has often been some of the known animes in their library that were missing here and that you could guarantee that people would watch, usually more than once. I vaguely recall that once being told something that it might have something to with the publishing rights of the manga (if the anime was based on one), but I may be recalling that all wrong.
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19

Ohiotaku wrote:

I suggest getting used to it or finding a new hobby now that big name media & communication companies have taken an interest in anime


Until they don't anymore. I've ridden this roller-coaster before. Back in the 90s mainstream media got all hot and bothered with anime then they lost interest as revenues didn't warrant the expenditures and live-action movies bombed right and left. Anime by-and-large still remains a niche market. Give it a couple of years and a few more bombs and while I expect directors, writers, etc will keep talking about their anime influences the big studios will have lost interest.
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/11/19

HOOfan_1 wrote:

So now we wait to see if Funimation actually does expand.


It has been SIX months since the CxF partnership, I am tired of waiting for Funimation to make an effort to enter my neck of the woods, so ...

We've got us a map (a map!)
To lead us to a hidden box
That's all locked up with locks (with locks!)
And buried deep away
We'll dig up the box (the box!)
We know it's full of precious booty!
Burst open the locks!
And then we'll say, "Hooray!"
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Posted 4/11/19 , edited 4/12/19

JorduSpeaks wrote:

Funimation gets a monopoly on One Punch Man.

It was Viz that got it (and put it on Hulu in the US). I expect people in Canada would have preferred Funimation, as at least then they would be able to view it.

Viz is normally the company one least likes to see get an anime (at least for streaming).

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Posted 4/12/19 , edited 4/12/19

domvina wrote:


Ohiotaku wrote:

I suggest getting used to it or finding a new hobby now that big name media & communication companies have taken an interest in anime


Until they don't anymore. I've ridden this roller-coaster before. Back in the 90s mainstream media got all hot and bothered with anime then they lost interest as revenues didn't warrant the expenditures and live-action movies bombed right and left. Anime by-and-large still remains a niche market. Give it a couple of years and a few more bombs and while I expect directors, writers, etc will keep talking about their anime influences the big studios will have lost interest.


It was quite different in the 90s since the "mainstream media" that was interested in anime was western television networks which were and still are an old and slowly dying media outlet who were looking for cheap new content to try and push to their preexisting audiences. The demographic they targeted was mostly kids since they were a large mainstream audience that was already proven to enjoy western cartoons and which anime could pretty easily be passed off as with a little bit of dubbing, clever marketing and westernization.

This time around anime's return to main stream media has come because the niche streaming community that has been into anime all along has essentially become large enough to be considered mainstream.

In other words its not an established media outlet trying to introduce a new product to their audience but rather big media companies coming in and buying up the small ones catering to the niche anime audience that already exists. Unlike last time they aren't trying to introduce anime to the western world, instead they are just buying up all the distribution rights to the anime that's being made in order to cash in on the large international audience that already exists and is rapidly growing on its own.



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Posted 4/12/19 , edited 4/12/19

Cobaltseas wrote:

Perhaps in some regions, but for example despite living in a non-English speaking part of Europe anime isn't translated to anything but English where I live. Except on TV. But not on CR. So theoretically there is no reason for why I shouldn't have the same access as any other CR viewer.


If they don't already do business in that country they will have to register for things like VAT and set up accounting and pay the lawyers to check what legislation they need to comply with and then make the changes required to do so.

In many cases the cost of doing this may exceed the expected benefits - especially if the country has a lot of onerous law.

No company randomly ignores potential markets - if they aren't there its because its not going to make them a profit for whatever reason.
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Posted 4/12/19 , edited 4/14/19

Karrissel wrote:

No company randomly ignores potential markets -


Unless they are called Funimation. For example, when Amazon pulled the plug on Sentai's Anime Strike, in no time they created Hidive and started streaming to latinamerica in no time. Crunchyroll was slower (but still the first) to stream, they started three years after going legal and have not stopped since. Meanwhile Netflix and Amazon Prime have entered my neck of the woods while Funimation had several YEARS to stream into our region (whose licence is as a rule of the thumb sold as one block) but they were (and are) happy with just blocking crunchyroll (and now Netflix/Amazon) their content. If Aniplex is the hoarder of anime disc rights, then Funimation is the hoarder of anime streaming rights.
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Posted 4/12/19 , edited 4/13/19

Karrissel wrote:

Maybe the answer is some kind of cross platform subscription that gives you access to everything as I can't see exclusive deals going away?


They're not even bothering getting VRV to other countries so seems a pipe dream.
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Posted 4/12/19 , edited 4/13/19

curr0001 wrote:

Welcome to the internet where they want you eyeballs on there streaming platform. It's only going to get worse folks.

i can't even watch One punch man season 2 legally, being A Canadian and all.


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Posted 4/13/19 , edited 4/13/19


If that was the actual Grumpy Cat, the picture would be purr-fect! That kitty does not look happy.
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Posted 4/13/19 , edited 4/13/19

No it's a monopoly. This is more like say Wendy's buying up the rights to hamburgers the world over, and only selling them in the US. That nobody else can market hamburgers anywhere. So if you unfortunately want a hamburger where they don't have any outlets, you can't get one legally because not only do they have a monopoly on sales in countries that have Wendys, they don't allow any other place to sell hamburgers even where they themselves don't. So you go to places that do so illegally, as people want hamburgers. (FYI I have never seen a Wendy's outside of the US) Streaming services do not necessarily stream world wide. If they won the exclusive rights to an anime they prohibit anyone else from streaming that anime anywhere, even if they don't themselves. They completely block access to people who can't access their services to begin with by buying the exclusive rights. If other streaming services that could deliver to those areas could also buy rights to the same anime, then no one could be blocked for that reason. It would possibly ensure that prices would remain reasonable and maybe generate more money for the industry as a whole.


Indeed. This is the same reason why the gamer community are so displeased with the new Epic Games distribution platform. They have signed exclusive 1-year deals on several games and are using them to "force" people to use their service. Some might argue that this is "just how the market works", but it's not true competition. It pretty much equates to creating an artificial scarcity on availability. That becomes particularly ridiculous by the fact that digital media has unlimited availability.

True competition would mean that everyone were free to distribute the media, but competing with other distributors by means of pricing and quality of service. The current exclusive deals on media simply means that a distributor can be lazy and brute-force a monopoly. This kills competition and the idea of a free market.

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